BEP Seal
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
U.S. Department of the Treasury

Pictured below: Display cases in currency exhibit panels.
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Current Exhibit
 

One Hundred Dollar Designs

1862-2010
The Changing Look of America’s $100 Notes

The Small-sized $100 Federal Reserve Note
Left, top to bottom: $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1928, face; $100 Uniform Currency Back, Series 1928-1950E; $100 Uniform Currency Back, Series 1963A-1993; $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1990, face, with close-up of microprinting; Right, top to bottom: $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1996, face; $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1996, back
Left, top to bottom: $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1928, face; $100 Uniform Currency Back, Series 1928-1950E; $100 Uniform Currency Back, Series 1963A-1993; $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1990, face, with close-up of microprinting; Right, top to bottom: $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1996, face; $100 Federal Reserve Note, Series 1996, back

With the issuance of small-sized notes in 1929, a portrait of Benjamin Franklin again appeared on the face of the $100 note.  Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was selected for the back.  Over time, minor design modifications were made.  In 1966, the words, “In God We Trust,” were added to the back and, starting with Series 1990 notes, a security thread in the paper and microprinting were added.

 

The Series 1996 note featured a new, enlarged portrait of Benjamin Franklin.  It was based on a circa 1785 painting by Joseph Siffred Duplessis.  The image of Independence Hall remained essentially the same but was set within a simplified oval background.  Additional anti-counterfeiting features included a watermark and color shifting inks.