Graphic of the BEP Seal
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
U.S. Department of the Treasury

Pictured below: Back of a $5 note showing the large numeral 5.
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Meaningful Access

In May 2002, the American Council of the Blind (ACB) and two visually impaired individuals filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia alleging that the currency of the United States violates the rights of the blind and visually impaired because they could not denominate United States paper currency.  In October 2008, the District Court ruled that the Department of the Treasury must provide meaningful access to U.S. currency for blind and other visually impaired persons in the next currency redesign.  Read the American Council for the Blind court order injunction (filed October 3, 2008).

 
 


Meaningful Access Recommendations Approved by the Secretary


On May 31, 2011, Secretary of the Treasury Timothy F. Geithner approved the methods that the Department of the Treasury will use to provide blind and visually impaired individuals with meaningful access to U.S. currency. The Secretary approved that BEP will implement the following accommodations:

 

  • Tactile Feature: Adding a raised tactile feature to U.S. currency unique to each U.S. Federal Reserve note that it may lawfully change1, which will provide users with a means of identifying each denomination via touch.  BEP will consult with currency stakeholders at all stages of the process.
  • High Contrast Numerals: Continuing the program of adding large high contrast numerals and different colors to each denomination that it is permitted by law to alter. BEP will consult with currency stakeholders at all stages of the process.
  • Currency Reader Program: Implementing a supplemental currency reader distribution program for blind and visually impaired U.S. citizens and those legally residing in the U.S.

 

The new note features will be introduced together in the next currency redesign following the redesigned $100 note.  BEP intends to implement the currency reader program as soon as possible to provide some immediate relief to the blind and visually impaired population, while addressing the transition that will occur during the co-circulation of notes with and without tactile and high contrast features. 

 

1Currently, U.S. law prohibits any changes to the $1 Federal Reserve note.


As more information is available regarding progress in creating meaningful access to U.S. currency, it will be posted on this website.  


 

GAO Issues Opinion on Currency Reader Program

 

In January 2013, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) requested an opinion from United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) as to whether the BEP could give, rather than loan as government property, a currency reader to eligible blind and visually impaired individuals as part of its meaningful access program. 
 
On June 7, 2013 the GAO issued its opinion in support of the BEP’s plan to use appropriated funds to purchase and give currency readers to blind and visually impaired individuals as part of its compliance with the federal district court order to provide such individuals with meaningful access to U.S. currency.  GAO’s opinion can be viewed at http://www.gao.gov/products/D04870#mt=e-report.

 
 

Currency Identification Mobile Applications
 
Advances in technology have enabled a quick and convenient means for blind and visually impaired individuals to determine a note’s denomination by using their personal mobile devices.

 

BEP in collaboration with the Department of Education assisted in the development of The IDEAL Currency Identifier, a free downloadable app that operates on the Android platform.  

 

BEP has updated the EyeNote® App originally released in 2010.  EyeNote® 2.0 utilizes a continuous scan function. The continuous scanning shall commence once the application has loaded. EyeNote® 2.0 also utilizes VoiceOver for vocal and gesture feedback if it is turned on for the target iOS device. The press release announcing Version 2.0 can be viewed here.


The launch of these apps is not in lieu-of the other accommodations the Government is developing to assist blind and visually impaired individuals in denominating U.S. currency.  These apps simply provide a quicker option for the public, who are increasingly using mobile devices, while the Government develops a currency reader program and the raised tactile and large, high-contrast numeral features to be included in the next U.S. currency note designs.
 
Access links to other currency denominating apps that are currently available to the public.

 


 

BEP Participation at Stakeholder Organization Meetings and Conventions

 

  • National Library Service (NLS) National Conference 5/3/2014 through 5/8/2014 in Oklahoma City, OK.
  • National Federation for the Blind (NFB) Annual Conference 7/1/2014 through 7/6/2014 in Orlando, FL.
  • American Council for the Blind (ACB) Annual Conference 7/11/2014 through 719/2014 in Las Vegas, NV. Blinded Veterans Association (BVA) Annual Conference 8/17/2014 through 8/21/2014 in Reno, NV

 


Visual Impairment Study and Process to Create Meaningful Access to U.S. Currency

 

A comprehensive study analyzing options for the blind and visually impaired community to denominate U.S. currency was submitted to BEP in July 2009. The study's findings were considered by BEP in evaluating potential accommodations as to the best method(s) for allowing those who are blind and visually impaired to denominate U.S. paper currency.

 

On May 20, 2010, the Department of the Treasury and BEP issued a notice in the Federal Register. The purposes of the notice was to inform the public of the features that BEP intends to propose to the Secretary of the Treasury to accommodate people who are blind and visually impaired in denominating U.S. currency and to solicit public comment on the proposed accommodations. The public comment period closed on August 18, 2010. Comments may still be viewed at www.regulations.gov.

 

On June 22, 2010, as part of the public comment process, BEP hosted two open public forums simultaneously at the Washington, DC and Fort Worth, TX facilities. Transcripts from these forums are available to view at www.regulations.gov.

 

Using findings from the study and feedback from the public, BEP submitted its recommendations to the Secretary of the Treasury.

 

 

Contact Us

 

We encourage the public to continue to comment on meaningful access by submitting an email to meaningful.access@bep.gov.
 

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